Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Conquering a Move and the Excess Baggage of Life



By Chris Hammond

There is nothing quite like moving to remind you just how much stuff you have in the hidden corners of your home.  Things seem to procreate over time and that one small pile of papers to review on your desk now has another pile on the dining room table and yet another in the kitchen.   The task of sorting, organizing and purging can be overwhelming and might even provoke a disagreement or two with your spouse.

While moving is frustrating and is listed amongst the top life stressors, it can also be a time of purging your life from all of the excess stuff that has gathered.  The benefit of purging is a feeling of freedom from the responsibility to care for the stuff.  Oddly enough, our lives can become just as cluttered with excess activities, friendships, responsibilities or commitments and it too can use a good cleansing every now and then.  However, you must have a plan to attack either the stuff or the excess in your life.   

Essential items.  The first items to identify in your move or your life are the essentials.  These are the things you need daily and cannot live without.  In a move it may be your toiletries, a favorite pot, a book you are reading or your computer.  In life it may be a hug from your kids, spending time in God’s word, exercise or a favorite hobby.  Whatever it is put these items aside knowing that they are the most essential items you have.

Keepsake items.  Next comes the items that you love and want to keep but are not essential.  These are the things that you would miss if they were lost, would like to pass on to a family member, or deeply regret not having in the future.  In a move it may be your photo albums, a wedding dress, books, china, or a collection of baseball cards.  In life it may be an annual family reunion, a date with your children or spouse, a convention, or a commitment to work with the homeless.  The trick is keeping your keepsake items to a minimum as not to be adding too much to your plate after the essential items are established.  If you are not sure it is a keepsake, move on.

Throw-away items.  Now you are ready for the throw-away items which should be easier to identify once the essential and keepsake items are already sorted.  These are the items that you can really do without and drain your energy.  In a move it may be old tablecloths that you have not used in a while, old clothes that have not been worn in years, or old newspapers that are collecting dust.  In life it may be a charity that you are no longer passionate about, a hobby that you have lost interest in, or a friend that is more draining than helpful.  Don’t think too hard about these items, if your first instinct is to get rid of it than do it.

Repeat again and again.  Finally you are ready for the last step which is to repeat the first three steps over and over until everything is sorted.  Nothing should be left without a final decision as to which category it belongs.  In a move as in life it is important to analyze the things you are holding onto and examine them to see if your interests have changed.  As you get older, it is natural to have changing interests and your house as your life should reflect the change.

A move is time consuming but it is helpful to sort through all of the stuff that you have accumulated over the years.  Your life likewise accumulates responsibilities and commitments that may no longer reflect your interests.  Taking the time to purge your home and life of the excess items will free you to spend more time with the things that really matter and ultimately decrease your stress.


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Reprint Permission- If this article helps you, please share it with your own list at work or church, forward it to friends and family or post it on your own site or blog. Just leave it intact and do not alter it in any way. Any links must remain in the article. Please include the following paragraph in your reprint.

"Reprinted with permission from the LifeWorks Group weekly eNews, (Copyright, 2004-2011), To subscribe to this valuable counseling and coaching resource visit
www.LifeWorksGroup.org or call 407-647-7005"

About the author-
Chris Hammond is a
Registered Mental Health Counselor Intern at LifeWorks Group w/ over 15 years of experience as a counselor, mentor & teacher for children, teenagers & adults.




How Healing Emotional Wounds is Like Healing Physical Wounds



By Chris Hammond, MS, IMH

Physical wounds are easy to spot as they usually leave physical evidence of an injury such as a broken bone or blood.  They also leave emotional evidence such as anxiety or pain.  Emotional wounds, like physical, can leave physical evidence such as loss of appetite or sudden sickness.  They also leave emotional evidence such as depression or anger.  However they do not always leave evidence.  These wounds are much harder to spot because they have been hidden or denied for so long but far more devastating in the end if not properly addressed.

To heal from a physical wound such as a large cut, you must begin by realizing that you have a wound.  Then you need to asses if it is a wound you can manage or if it is a wound that you need help managing.  Your next step is to clean out the wound, stitch the wound up if needed, and finally bandage the wound.  Failure to clean out the wound effectively can lead to infection.  Healing from an emotion wound works much the same way. 

Realizing you are wounded.  Emotional wounds are not as obvious as blood pouring out of your body but they do have some familiar signs.  They can stem from any number of traumatic situations such as a death of a loved one, sexual or physical abuse, car accident, divorce, unexpected pregnancy, bankruptcy or witnessing a crime.  Common signs of emotional wounds are depression, anxiety, anger outburst, isolation, change in interests, lacking enjoyment from life, and change in personality.  Realizing you are wounded and by what is the first step.  

Assessing your abilities.  One of the hardest steps is to asses if you are able to manage the emotional wound yourself or if you need help managing it.  It is extremely important that you accurately assess your abilities as in the example of a large cut, if you are wrong about your ability to manage the wound, the consequences can be lifelong.  It is much harder to clean out an infected wound that has already been improperly healed than it is to deal with it when it is fresh.  If you have recently experienced a traumatic situation, being honest with your abilities can be a life saving event.

Cleaning your wound.  Thoroughly cleaning out a large cut can not only prevent infection but it will also help the wound to heal faster than if you left it alone.  Cleaning out emotional wounds means revisiting the traumatic event and allowing yourself the freedom to feel the emotional pain.  It is also a time to confess any responsibility you may have in contributing to the trauma.  In the event of a large cut, you may have been handling a knife improperly; in the event of a traumatic situation, you may have ignored warning signs of danger. 

Stitching your wound.  Sometimes cleaning a large cut is not enough, you might need a few stitches to facilitate the healing process and ensure that it heals properly.  Stitching up emotional wounds means you recognize how other areas of your life have been affected by the trauma.  For instance, if your traumatic moment was verbal abuse by a parent, a spouse yelling at you could cause you to get overly angry and have an outburst.  The wound of verbal abuse needs to be stitched up before dealing with your spouse.

Bandaging your wound.  The last step in the physical healing of a large cut is to bandage it up to keep from reinjuring the area until it has fully healed.  Emotionally speaking, bandaging up wounds is granting forgiveness, accepting a loss or gain of life, being satisfied with less income or being peaceful in the midst of a storm.  Not that the pain has fully gone away or that there won’t be a scar left after the bandage has been taken off but rather there is calm where there used to be trauma.

All of these steps require time and patience with yourself and others as you begin to work through them.  The best part of reaching the end of this journey is the ability to guide others along the way because it is in watching their healing take place that you are able to find meaning in yours.



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Reprint Permission- If this article helps you, please share it with your own list at work or church, forward it to friends and family or post it on your own site or blog. Just leave it intact and do not alter it in any way. Any links must remain in the article. Please include the following paragraph in your reprint.

"Reprinted with permission from the LifeWorks Group weekly eNews, (Copyright, 2004-2011), To subscribe to this valuable counseling and coaching resource visit
www.LifeWorksGroup.org or call 407-647-7005"

About the author-
Christine Hammond is a
Registered Mental Health Counselor Intern at LifeWorks Group w/ over 15 years of experience as a counselor, mentor & teacher for children, teenagers & adults.


Friday, May 18, 2012

Positive Feedback About Dwight Bain's Book "Destination Success"

Adapted from Tumblr.com



"God has the best way to make me understand things."


I you had read my last post, you probably would think my day yesterday wasn’t good. In fact, totally bad. I don’t know why yesterday made me think several negative thoughts about myself, making feel miserable. That’s my mood swings. Little things made me feel depressed, and feeling depressed from the start would either ruined my day or ruined my day.

Later that night, while wandering in my room (though I don’t have a big room, I still wander around, lol), I saw a book. It’s not a novel, a non-fiction rather. I don’t read non-fictions. Sorry for those who read it but I find it really boring. I feel like in doesn’t bring me to another world, like fantasies. But then because of my mood, I tried to read it. The title’s Destination Success. Maybe you find it weird, “why should I read this?” I’ve thought of that too actually. But the first pages makes me want to read more. It literally enlightened me.

I’ve marked the points which was beautifully said and like, hit me:

Sorry for spamming you with pages of a book. lol. I just find it really interesting and enlightening.

This book includes seven secrets of success and I am currently on the end of the second. I liked reading it. I like to finish it as soon as possible because I want to test if what the reviewer said was true, that after you’re done reading it, your life would never be the same.

Thank you Dwight Bain.

Source: queonne
#Destination success#quotes#sayings

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Destination Success - a map for living out your dreams


Destination Success is an inspirational book for everyone. It has 7 secrets to live a successful life. These secrets are real, helpful and practical. To everyone who wants to be a success seeker, a success mindset, who doesn’t want to be feeling low and unmotivated, this is for YOU.

I have listed some wonderful lessons along my reading. Please read them through. Feel free to share!


•What you want to be eventually, you must be everyday. With practice, the quality of your deeds gets down to your soul. - Frank Crane


•If you try to sit on 2 chairs, you’ll fall between them. For life, you must choose 1 chair. Luciano Pavarotti’s Father


•Spend your money on experiences for your children and not just on toys. - Dr. Jim Henry


•Recreation is doing something with others and creating an experience that result in more value for you and those with whom you shared it.


•Where success is concerned, people are not measured in inches or pounds, or college degrees or family background. They are measured by the size of their thinking. How big we think determines the size of our accomplishments


•Belief = Behavior (B=B) —Love this!


•If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with success unexpected in common hours. - Henry David Thoreau

•If you treat people to a vision of themselves, if you apparently overrate them, you make them become what they’re capable of becoming. If you take them as they should be, you help them become what they can be. - Viktor Frankl


•Never let work drive you, master it and keep it in complete control. - Booker T. Washington


•Stay above the problem level of life by viewing the potential level.


•Everyday that you are doing the right thing, you are being a success; it just hasn’t shown up yet. It’s just a matter of time. Success is a process. The secret is discovered in your daily agenda. - John Maxwell


•Success is a mindset. It’s managing your moods and mastering your motivation. Managing your mood requires discipline to control your impulses while keeping positive attitude no matter what happens. Mastering your motivation is discovering and harnessing the powerful drives in your soul.

And the 7 Secrets of Success are:
#1 Defining WHAT success means to YOU

#2 Finding success Everyday

#3 Building success by Mastering Yourself

#4 Developing Personal Discipline to Discover your Destiny

#5 Belief - Finding your hidden source of Inner Strength

#6 Opportunity - discovering your Success Magnet

#7 Excellence - Living the Life you’ve always wanted
To know more, read the Destination Success by Dwight Bain.

#Destination Success#book




© Tumblr, Inc.HelpAboutDevelopersThemesMeetupsJobsTerms


http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/dwight-bain

Monday, May 14, 2012

The Power of Unforgiveness


By: Christine Hammond, MS, IMH

College towns are hard to get around just on foot because of the distance between classes and dorms, so as a college student, I took up bike riding.  One day while riding in the street, granted I was riding in the opposite direction of traffic which is strangely prophetic of my college years, my wheel got caught in an old railroad track causing my bike to twist and overturn.  As my head was falling to the ground, I looked up to see a car headed straight for me.  Suddenly, my life literally flashed before my eyes with all of its highs and lows.  Thankfully the car stopped just before it reached my head and I suffered only a sprained ankle and a fractured arm.


Take a moment and imagine the highs and lows of your life right now, what images or people would pop into your head?  More than likely there are high moments with people and places of great excitement, joy, and love.  More than likely there are also low moments that are still causing you some residual anxiety, stress or anger.  One of the reasons those low moments leave residual emotional scars is because of unforgiveness.  Unforgiveness of past events or people can be powerful and destructive even to your current relationships. 


Quick to anger.  if you find yourself quick to get angry over little issues, taking too many things personally,  or to blowing things out of proportion to their significance, more than likely you are harboring unforgiveness.  Anger is a powerful emotion that often has its roots in past rather than current events.  Our unresolved past events especially those events that were traumatic in nature creep into our current anger outbursts.


Biting sarcasm.  If you find yourself using biting sarcasm which is sarcasm that takes a dig at another person and find them not laughing or nervously laughing, more than likely you are harboring unforgiveness.  Biting sarcasm is anger’s close cousin and it is an effort to mask true feelings of anger and resentment.  Perhaps quicker than an angry outburst, biting sarcasm can destroy a relationship because it is a back-handed attack.


Malicious gossip.  If you find yourself needing to talk to several people about the same issue or person over and over to get just one more perspective, more than likely you are harboring unforgiveness.  Gossip is talking about someone behind their back.  Some even go to the lengths to justify their gossip by saying they were just trying to inform or protect someone else.  This is still gossip and your present relationships go on guard each time you talk about someone else behind their back.


Dreaming of revenge.  If you find yourself daydreaming of getting back at someone or seeking out ways to outdo someone else to prove you are better, more than likely you are harboring unforgiveness.  Revenge comes in many forms and it does not always have to be physically harmful to another person.  Just wanting a person to get what they deserve, lose a relationship, have financial hardships, or feel pain is vengeful thinking.  Your present relationships will then be in fear of retribution rather than feel your love.


Unforgiveness is powerful in that it gives you the false sense that you are in control.  By harboring the negative feelings, a person can feel like they are in charge.  But sadly, the person or event that caused the unforgiveness is really in control and in charge as you are merely reacting to the person or event.  Take charge of your own life and don’t allow someone else or something else to control what you are doing or how you are reacting.  Better yet, turn your life and your unforgiveness over to God and allow Him to take care of the person or situation. 


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Reprint Permission- If this article helps you, please share it with your own list at work or church, forward it to friends and family or post it on your own site or blog. Just leave it intact and do not alter it in any way. Any links must remain in the article. Please include the following paragraph in your reprint.

"Reprinted with permission from the LifeWorks Group weekly eNews, (Copyright, 2004-2011), To subscribe to this valuable counseling and coaching resource visit
www.LifeWorksGroup.org or call 407-647-7005"

About the author-
Chris Hammond is a
Registered Mental Health Counselor Intern at LifeWorks Group w/ over 15 years of experience as a counselor, mentor & teacher for children, teenagers & adults.

Friday, May 11, 2012

Want a Better Relationship? A.S.K. for it!

By Dwight Bain
The key to a better relationship is a lot simpler than you think. In fact the key to a better life is also simple – it’s not being afraid to ask. The Bible teaches you have not because you ask not. (James 4:2). Consider the following situations that could have been easily solved… if someone had the courage to ASK.

Think of how many times a student was struggling to finish a class, but was afraid to ask for extra time or extra credit.

Or the shy guy in High School who thinks the cute girl in his English class likes him, but he is afraid to ask her out on a date.

How about a woman who knows she is right for the promotion at work, but stays quiet, never asking for more responsibility or a raise to go with it.

Or a husband who wonders if his wife still loves him, but never speaks up and then is trapped into a tempting addiction to cope with his loneliness that he didn’t have to experience… if he only had stepped up to ask.

You may have heard the phrase that someone “Can't read your mind” in the relationship, which is a simple way to draw attention to the need to speak up about issues. What if your loved one doesn’t practice this advice? Then you have to step up to A.S.K. I describe this relationship strategy with the letters A.S.K. Here’s how it works.

A- is to challenge you to be assertive- to be bold enough to speak up in a direct manner, to not stay silent or shy and to get to the point by not playing games

S- is to be sincere, to be honest and to be able to talk straight from an open heart Finally, the

K – is to be kind. Especially with tough issues, since kind communication on tough issues is easier to hear than coming across as mean or attacking.

Since the key to successful relationships is to be able to ask questions, here are a few to get you started.

· Can we spend more time together?
· Do you love me?
· Can you help me with this?
· What's going on?
· When do you want to do this?
· Do you know how to meet my needs?

Some questions are going to be harder to ask than others. Often the toughest questions can bring about tremendous results if you muster up enough courage to directly ASK. For instance, “Can you stop spending?” or “What were you watching on the computer when I walked into the room?” or “When can we go back to church as a family?” or “What do I need to do to move ahead with this company to make more money?”

Other questions may sound sappy, like something out of a “chick flick” but asking tender questions can take your personal relationships to a deeper level of intimacy. It’s better to ask, “Can we just sit together tonight and watch the sunset?” or “Why don’t we call your mom to watch the kids so we can go to the beach for a romantic weekend?” or “I need you to be more affectionate, could you say ‘I love you’ more?”

Either approach, tough or tender brings results when you remember to use the formula.

· A- Assertive
· S- Sincere
· K- Kind


 
So next time you feel like complaining that you are misunderstood, under-appreciated, under-paid or unloved, why not spend your energy asking questions that may lead to your needs being met by the people around you. Over 2,000 years ago St. James challenged people to solve their lack by simply asking. That same advice works
today. So if you find yourself in a situation where you have not… solve that by asking.



More importantly, if you find yourself in a desperate situation where nothing seems to be working and no one understands you; try asking God for help. You can always pour out your needs, hurts, doubts and frustrations to Him. He will never reject you and may even meet your needs with a direct answer. Prayer works because it is built on the core relationship advice skill of asking. Try it!

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 Reprint Permission If this article helped you, you are invited to share it with your own list at work or church, forward it to friends and family or post it on your own site or blog. Just leave it intact and do not alter it in any way. Any links must remain in the article. Please include the following paragraph in your reprint.

"Reprinted with permission from the LifeWorks Group weekly eNews, (Copyright, 2004-2012), To subscribe to this valuable counseling and coaching resource visit
www.LifeWorksGroup.org or call 407-647-7005"

About the author-
Dwight Bain is dedicated to helping people achieve greater results. He is a Nationally Certified Counselor and Certified Life Coach in practice since 1984 with a primary focus on solving crisis events and managing major change.

Tuesday, May 08, 2012

Parents Need Agreement to Protect Kids in Ugly Divorces


By: Dwight Bain


People ending their marriage through divorce still have a responsibility to be good parents. These are key issues to discuss in the process of protecting your kids from experiencing more emotional pain.
Map out your thoughts, and then work together with the other parent of your children to create a reasonable way to be effective as parents, while not placing kids in the middle of parental conflicts.


(Remember, while these are essential parenting issues to protect the emotions of your children this is not a legal action. If you have legal questions about how the divorce process affects your children, you should discuss them with an attorney).


1. How can the children spend time with their parents to avoid feeling rejected?

2. What schedule will work for the children to see parents on weekdays?

3. What schedule will work for the children to see parents on the weekends?

4. What schedule will work for the children to have connection as a family on holidays,
school breaks or in the summer?

5. How can the children have regular access to each parent by telephone?

6. Who do the parents agree is a safe person to help with pick-up/drop off?

7. How can we include other family members so that they don’t lose contact with the kids? (especially Grandparents) 


 8. How can we preserve the family traditions built during the marriage around major events like
Christmas or Thanksgiving?

9. What is a realistic way for children to stay connected to their parents on Mother’s Day or
Father’s Day?

10. What is a realistic way to honor the birthday of a child without taking the focus off of their
special day due to parental or extended family conflict?

11. When a disagreement may come up regarding what is best for our children/child,
how will we handle it?

12. What schools will work best for our children, and how will be pay for any educational expenses?

13. What is a reasonable way for each of us as parents to stay connected with our children’s school experience, grades, teacher meetings and so on?

14. How will we handle the expenses of medical care, dental care, mental health care and how can we communicate about those visits?

15. What plan will we follow if either parent has to relocate due to work?

16. How do we want our children raised regarding religious experiences, church/temple or youth group activity?

17. Can we agree as parents to follow the same rules of conduct for our children to avoid confusion or ‘splitting’ of parental authority?

18. Can we agree as parents about the use of tobacco or alcohol in front of our children?

19. Can we agree as parents with regard to potential safety hazards that our children may be exposed to, (e.g. the availability of firearms, use of guns, boating or four wheel off-road vehicles or drug/alcohol use on the premises or any potential exposure to unsafe circumstances)

20. Can we agree as parents to promote and support a positive relationship between the
children and the other parent?

21. Can we agree as parents to not expose our children to criticism, blaming or put-downs of the other parent?

22. Can we agree as parents to always treat the other parent respectfully and courteously?

23. Can we agree as parents o not use the children as a go-between to communicate messages
or to make plans with the other parent?

24. Can we as parents agree to be adaptable and flexible in resolving disagreements?

25. Can we as parents agree to not assume something is true before checking it out with the other parent?

26. Can we as parents agree to not side with the children in order to put the other parent in disfavor?

27. Can we as parents agree to mutually seek out a professional opinion regarding any dispute about the children and agree to abide by it?

28. Can we as parents agree to work cooperatively to resolve whatever problem behaviors or school problems the children may experience?

29. Can we as parents agree to not plan activities for the children at times when they are scheduled to be with the other parent?

30. Can we as parents agree to pick up and return children promptly at agreed upon times?

31. Can we as parents agree to do nothing to make my children feel badly about loving the other parent?

32. Can we as parents agree to keep the other parent well informed about the children progress in school and major activities in which they may participate in, (like drama, sports, music, or computer classes and so on)

33. Can we as parents agree to acknowledge that the single most powerful factor affecting a child’s psychological and emotional well-being following a divorce is the degree to which their parents continue to fight over them, so we each realize that we must do everything in our power to be generous, gracious and forgiving toward each other as ex-spouses in order to reduce the potential for conflict.

34. Finally, can we agree as parents to not expose our children to harm by inappropriate or excessive use of alcohol, drugs, pornography, gambling or any other hazardous physical activities?


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Reprint Permission- If this article helped you, you are invited to share it with your own list at work or church, forward it to friends and family or post it on your own site or blog. Just leave it intact and do not alter it in any way. Any links must remain in the article. Please include the following paragraph in your reprint.

"Reprinted with permission from the LifeWorks Group weekly eNews, (Copyright, 2004-2012), To subscribe to this valuable counseling and coaching resource visit
www.LifeWorksGroup.org or call 407-647-7005"

About the author- Dwight Bain is dedicated to helping people achieve greater results. He is Certified Family Law Mediator, a Nationally Certified Counselor, and Certified Life Coach in practice since 1984 with a primary focus on solving crisis events and managing major change.


Monday, May 07, 2012

Why Are You So Angry?

By: Christine Hammond, MS, IMH


It happens.  You are driving down the left side of highway slightly faster than normal because you are late and suddenly someone cuts right in front of you causing you to slam on your breaks and almost hit their vehicle.  Instantly, you are angry.  Or how about your spouse promising he or she will be home by a certain time and you have made plans based on that time frame but your spouse doesn’t show up, answer the phone or even call.  By the time your spouse arrives home all plans have to be canceled and you are angry.

There are several bad ways of handling anger but according to Scripture, there are only two good ways of handling it.  One is from Psalms 4:4, “Don’t sin by letting anger control you.  Think about it overnight and remain silent”.  The second is from Ephesians 4:26-27, “And “don’t sin by letting anger control you.” Don’t let the sun go down while you are still angry, for anger gives a foothold to the devil”.  Either method works depending on your personality or the situation but first some common misunderstandings about anger need to be cleared up.

Defining Anger.  Most likely, you have experienced a time when everything seems to be going just fine and then all of a sudden something happens and you feel this rush of intense emotion causing your heart to race, your voice to get louder, or your fists to clench.  And then it happens, you say or do something that you normally would not do if the intense emotion had not occurred.  That is anger.  And while anger in and of itself is a God given emotion, it becomes sinful when it controls your behavior.  This emotion is quite useful in life and death situations as it propels you into action motivating you beyond what you would normally do.  But it can be destructive in personal relationships as it leaves a path of disaster much like the path of a tornado.

Blaming Anger.  Just because you are feeling angry and this emotion in some cases may be justified, it does not give you license to harm anyone in your path. How many times have you heard someone say, “You make me so angry”?  The reality is that they are responsible for getting angry just as you are responsible for your own anger.  Anger can control you which is what the two verses point out and that control does lead to sin.  No one can “make” you angry unless you choose to be angry.  Sometimes that choice is not a conscious one but an unconscious choice based on experiences and decisions made in the past.  Nonetheless, it is your choice to allow anger to control you.

Managing Anger.  The two passages above mention two different ways of dealing with your anger.  One is to not speak and think about your anger overnight.  The other is to confront your anger.  However, neither passage even slightly hints that your spouse must be involved in either.  If you are responsible for your own anger and letting anger get out of control is sinful then it is not the responsibility of your spouse to resolve your anger rather it is yours.  “Don’t let the sun go down while you are still angry” is about your behavior and desire to hold onto things that should be let go or dealt with accordingly.

Reconciling Anger.  Once you have defined your anger, accepted responsibility for it and managed properly managed it, then you can begin the process of reconciliation.  Since anger destroys relationships, it is likely that there is a trail of failed relationships in the quake of your anger.  Even if the relationship may seem to be fine, unreconciled anger limits intimacy.  Your present anger may have less to do with present circumstances and more to do with your past.  Take the time to reconcile old relationships and you will find that your anger is less intense the next time.

Anger can be one of the most useful tools in helping you to grow and deal with your past but it can also be one of the most destructive if not addressed properly.  If you know of someone who needs help with their anger, speak up kindly and lovingly in a safe environment but make sure you have already addressed your anger issues first.  This effort while draining just might be one of the best things you do for your relationships.


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Reprint Permission- If this article helps you, please share it with your own list at work or church, forward it to friends and family or post it on your own site or blog. Just leave it intact and do not alter it in any way. Any links must remain in the article. Please include the following paragraph in your reprint.

"Reprinted with permission from the LifeWorks Group weekly eNews, (Copyright, 2004-2011), To subscribe to this valuable counseling and coaching resource visit
www.LifeWorksGroup.org or call 407-647-7005"

About the author-
Chris Hammond is a
Registered Mental Health Counselor Intern at LifeWorks Group w/ over 15 years of experience as a counselor, mentor & teacher for children, teenagers & adults.